Ayutthaya Temples, Temples in Ayutthaya with their History

larger text smaller
Temple in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya
Temples
Wat Borom Phuttharam
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Borom Phuttharam
Wat Borom Phuttharam
Situated inside Rajabhat University Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, the north-facing temple was built some time during 1688 - 1703 during the reign of King Phetracha on his former residence area near the main gate of the southern city wall. Its location and area plan was confined to be in the north-south direction by ancient communication routes; namely, Khlong Cha Krai Noi in the east and a royal pathway known as Thanon Maha Ratthaya or Thanon Pa Tong in the west. Unlike other temples, the king had all buildings roofed with yellow glazed tiles and the temple became known as "Wat Krabueang Khlueap" or the "glazed tile temple". The construction took 2 years and the temple underwent a major renovation in the reign of King Borommakot, who had 3 pairs of door panels decorated with fine mother-of-pearl inlays. One pair of them is currently at Ho Phra Monthian Tham inside the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, the second is at Wat Benchamabophit (The Marble Temple), and the third was turned into cabinets and is now exhibited at the Bangkok National Museum.
Wat Chaiwatthanaram
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Chaiwatthanaram
Wat Chaiwatthanaram
Located on the bank of the Maenam Chao Phraya, to the west of the city island is Wat Chaiwatthanaram. Built in 1630 by King Prasat Thong to honor his mother, Wat Chai Wattanaram was conceived as a replica of the Angkor temple. A Royal monastery, the temples unique feature is a huge prang which is surrounded by smaller prangs. This symbolizes Mount Meru, the abode of the heavenly gods. Now restored, the temple is also accessible by a long-tailed boat trip from Chankasem Palace Pier. This 1-hour trip to the temple costs approximately 300 - 400 bahts (round-trip).

Ayutthaya Historical Park provides the audio tour in English described for Wat Phra Si Sanphet, Wat Chai Watthanaram, and Wat Mahathat. Available at Ayutthaya Historical Park ticketing counter. The fee is 150 Baht.
Wat Chumphon Nikayaram
Location : Nakhon Luang District
This is the monastery located in the front area of Kho Muang, opposite to the train station. It was founded in 1632, by King Prasatthong's command and restored during the reign of King Rama IV.
Wat Kasattrathirat Worawihan
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Kasattrathirat Worawihan
Wat Kasattrathirat Worawihan
Is the monastery located outside Ko Muang, opposite Chedi Phra Si Suriyothai, on the bank of the Chao Phraya river. Its former name was Kasattra or Kasattraram. It is an ancient temple of the Ayutthaya period with a main Prang (stupa) as its center.
Wat Kai
Location : Bang Pahan District
Located at Tambon Han Sang, 25 kilometres from Ayutthaya, the entrance to the temple is 600 metres away to the right and marked by a monkey symbol. It dates from the Ayutthaya period and was once abandoned after the fall of the Ayutthaya Kingdom. Around 1992, it was renovated and established as a 'Samnak Song' - a monastic residence - before having been granted consecrated boundaries in 1997 for establishing a temple and named "Wat Kai" or 'Chicken Temple' after the fact that a large number of chicken died of an epidemic here. The temple also provides home for a large herd of wild macaques that are not fierce but no one knows as to when they came to take sanctuary here.
Wat Kudidao
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Located to the east in front of the railway station, this old monastery was beautifully constructed with better craftsmanship than many other temples as can be seen from the remaining ruins which have been left deteriorate.
Wat Lokkayasutha
Location : Amphoe Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya
This monastery is over a kilometer behind Wat Suanluangsopsawan adjacent to Wat Worachettharam. Accessible by the road inside the compound of the distillery plant, or through the road behind the Phlapphla Trimuk (three-gabled roof pavilion), it is in the area of the ancient palace passing Wat Woraphot and Wat Worachettharam going to the site of the large reclining Buddha, made of brick and covered with plaster, approximately 29 meters long. Many large hexagonal pillar ruins near the image are believed to be the ruins of the Ubosot.
Wat Na Phramen
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Na Phramen
Wat Na Phramen
The former name of this monastery was Wat Phra Merurachikaram. Located on the bank of Khlong Sabua opposite the grand palace, the date of construction is unknown. The Ubosot design is of very old typical Thai style. The most interesting objects are the principal Buddha image, which is fully decorated in regal attire. The most interesting fact attributed to the image is that it escaped destruction when the Burmese were burning everything down. It was from the grounds of this temple that the Burmese King Chao Along Phaya decided to fire a cannon at the Grand Palace.

The temple is located across the river north of the palace. Although the date of construction is unknown, the temple has been restored a number of times but still has a finely proportioned ubosot and viharn. The latter contains a large Dvaravati stone Buddha seated in European style, his hands on his knees, which some scholars think originated in Nakhon Pathom.

Opening Hours : 08:00 am. - 06:00 pm.

Wat Niwet Thamprawat
Location : Bang Pa-In District
This temple, which was built Rama V (Chulalongkorn), looks more like a Gothic Christian church than a Thai temple. Visitors can access the temple by crossing the river in a small trolley-like cable car. The crossing is free of charge. There are several nice boat trips departing from Bangkok to Bang Pa-In Palace, especially through cruise tours. The Palace is open from 09:00 am. to 03:00 pm.
Wat Phanan Choeng
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Phanan Choeng
Wat Phanan Choeng
Overlooking the river on the opposite bank from the main city, Wat Phanan Choeng was founded shortly before the establishment of Ayutthaya as the Kingdoms capital.

Its main building enshrines a huge, seated Buddha image, that is 57 feet tall an object of particular devotion to Thais of Chinese origin. This principal image called Phrachao Phananchoeng was built of stucco in the attitude of subduing evil in 1325. The temple is a popular stopover for riverboat cruises along the Maenam Chao Phraya. This temple can be reached by boat from the fortress ruins.
Wat Mahathat
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Located in front of the grand palace to the east near pa than bridge it was constructed in the reign of King Borom Rachathirat I. It houses the holy relics of Lord Buddha. Wat Mahathat was a grand temple, likes Wat Ratchaburana. It is the royal temple during glorious time. The main stupa crumbled late in the reign of king Rama V, in 1903. Buddha relics were enshrined in the Mahathat Chedi (the principal pagoda).

This monestery was once the residence of the Supreme Patriarch. The royal chronicle says that it was built in the reign of King Boroma-Rachathirat I in 1374 and completed in the reign of King Ramesuan. The main prang where the relic of the Lord Buddha was kept and found is originally 50 metres high. When King Songtham in 1610 - 1628 was in power the main prang (Khmer-style tower) collapsed. The restoration work on the prang was probably completed in the reign of King Prasatthong in 1630 - 1655. During the restoration the height of the prang was considerably increased.

Wat Mahathat
Wat Mahathat
Wat Mahathat was restored once again during the reign of King Borommakot (1732-1758 A.D.) when four porticos were added to the main prang. In 1767 when Ayutthaya was sacked the wat was burnt and has since then been in ruins. Wat Mahathat was a royal monastery and served as the seat of the Sangaraja. the head of the Buddhist monks of the Kamavasi Sect, since the time of the Mahathera Thammakanlayan, who was a contemporary of King Borommarachthriat I, and who built the wat. Wat Mahathat used to house an unusual Buddha image made of green stone in the form of Buddha seated on a throne. In the Rattanakosin Period King Rama III had the image moved to Wat Naphrameru.

At present only the base can be seen as the top was broken down in 1911 in the reign of King Rama VI. A large temple that was quite thoroughly ransacked by the Burmese. Several Leaning Prangs of Ayutthaya are still feebly defying gravity though, and the rows of headless Buddhas are atmospheric.

Ayutthaya Historical Park provides the audio tour in English described for Wat Phra Si Sanphet, Wat Chai Watthanaram, and Wat Mahathat. Available at Ayutthaya Historical Park ticketing counter. The fee is 150 Baht.
Wat Phraram
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
This monastery was situated outside the grand palace compound to the east. King Ramesuan commanded it built on ground, where the royal cremation ceremony for his father King U - Thong, took place. A big lagoon is in front of this monastery. its original name was "Nong Sano", it was changed to be "Bung Phraram" or currently Phraram Public Park.
Wat Phra Si Sanphet
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Phra Si Sanphet
Wat Phra Si Sanphet
In 1491, Wat Phra Si Sanphet was located inside the compound of the Grand Palace-the foundations of which are still visible-and served as the royal chapel, as Wat Phra Kaeo does in Bangkok. This Wang Lung Palace (Royal Palace) was built by King U-Thong upon the founding of the city. Used as a residential palace, it became a monastery in the reign of King Ramathibodi I. When King Borom Trai Lokanat commanded the construction of new living quarters, this residential palace was transformed into a temple, and the establishment of Wat Phra Si Sanphet. In Ayutthaya’s heyday, this was the largest temple in the city.

The three main chedis which have been restored contain the shes of three Ayutthaya kings. The temple is situated at the northern end of Si Sanphet Road. The royal chapel does not have any monks and novice inhabitants.

Ayutthaya Historical Park provides the audio tour in English described for Wat Phra Si Sanphet, Wat Chai Watthanaram, and Wat Mahathat. Available at Ayutthaya Historical Park ticketing counter. The fee is 150 baht.
Wat Phu Khao Thong
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Phu Khao Thong
Wat Phu Khao Thong
The Phu Khao Thong chedi is situated about two kilometres northwest of the city island. It was built by King Ramesuan in 1387. Burengnong, the Burmese king, built three layers of the large superimposed base in the Burmese style after he seized Ayutthaya in 1569 and named it Phu Khao Thong. The main body of the Thai-style chedi was built later.

King Borom Kot carried out renovations during his reign in 1744 and changed its appearance into a 12 cornered chedi. Only the lowest part retains its original Mon style. According to the records, a canal was dug from Wat Phu Khao Thong by a former monk of the temple to keep the Burmese army out when Ayutthaya was under Burmese attack in 1548. The moat which connects a canal with the main river is still in evidence and is called Mahanak canal in honor of the former monk. However, after Ayutthaya fell to the Burmese in 1767 the whole place was burned down. The Thai Government, under Premier Pibulsongkram, renovated the shrine again approximately 40 years ago.
Wat Phutthai Sawan
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
This monastery is located to the south of the river bank opposite the city island. Constructed in the area where King U-Thong and his subjects first migrated in order to establish the new town, it was formerly known as "Wiang Lek" named after the royal palace of King U-Thong. The most distinctive feature of this temple is the great principal Buddha image cast in the early Ayutthaya style.
Wat Ratchaburana
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Ratburana
Wat Ratchaburana
King Borom Rachathirat II (Chao Sam Phraya) built a temple on the site where his two elder brothers were cremated. His two brothers died in a power struggle to succeed their father, King Nakhon In who died in 1424. A series of bell-shaped chedis surround the main prang and a large oblong-shaped viharn is situated at the front. The architectural style evolved from the Khmer prasat, but has been adapted by the addition of a higher multi-layered base and an extended upper section. More corners were added to the main body and the tower section was extended to become corn-shaped. The antefixes, on the other hand, were attached to the body of the tower instead of leaving a decent gap between them which was common in Khmer prasats. These two temples are separated by Naresuan Rd.
Opening Hours : Daily from 08:00 am. - 06:00 pm
Wat Samanakottharam
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Located near Wat Kudidao, it was renovated by Chao Phraya Kosa (Lek) and Phraya Kosa (Pan) during the reign of King Narai the great. The main attraction is a large Prang having an unusual outlook different from the others. It is believed to imitate the design of Chedi Chet Yot of Chiangmai.
Wat Senasanaram
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
This ancient monastery named "Wat Sua" is behind Chankasem Palace. The main attractions are two Buddha images: Phra Samphuttha Muni, the principal image enshrined in the Ubosot, and Phra In Plaeng enshrined in the Wihan; both were transferred from Vientiane.

To get there, from Bangkok, upon crossing Naresuan Bridge to enter the city of Ayutthaya, turn left at the T-junction near Rajabhat University Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthya, turn right via the provincial hospital and the Park will be on the right.

Wat Suan Luang Sopsawan
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
King Maha Chakkraphat commanded the construction of this monastery on the west of the city which is the old military regiment area in the royal garden compound adjacent to the original area of Wat Sopsawan after the royal cremation of Queen Suriyothai. Her body was kept for the religious ceremonies in the Royal Garden (Suan Luang) Hall and was cremated there on the grounds.

Today, it is possible to visit a large pagoda called "Chedi Phra Si Suriyothai" that was built on the location of the crematorium.

Wat Suwandaram Ratchaworawihan
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Kasattrathirat Worawihan
Wat Kasattrathirat Worawihan
The temple is located inside the city wall to the southeast of the town island near Pom Phet. It was formerly known as "Wat Thong" and was constructed by King Rama I’s father since the Ayutthaya period. When King Rama I was crowned as the first king of the Rattanakosin period, he had the temple re-established and renamed it "Wat Suwan Dararam" to suggest his parents names.

The temple's Phra Ubosot - Ordination Hall - is of the late Ayutthaya style, being situated on a boat-like concave foundation. Its gable depicts the God Vishnu on his mount Garuda. Inside, there are murals of angels on the upper parts and scenes from the Jataka stories on the lower parts of the side walls. The front wall to which the principal Buddha image is facing depicts the scene of the Buddha Subduing Mara from the life of the Lord Buddha, with the Mother Earth Goddess in the centre. Unlike the Phra Ubosot, Phra Wihan – Lecture Hall – does not have a concave foundation and has pillars with a cap of elongated lotus petals. It was built in the reign of King Rama II. Inside, there are fine murals depicting the story of King Naresuan the Great painted in the reign of King Rama VII, which are the prototype of Don Chedi Monument in Suphan Buri. Thaen Phra Si Maha Pho A platform with lotus petals decoration supporting the sacred Bodhi tree, the shoot of which was brought from India by King Rama IV. There is a brick belfry of a western style nearby. The 2-tiered square structure with a pointed arch door downstairs and a bell tower upstairs is believed to have been built in the reign of King Rama IV during the major renovation.
Wat Tan En
Location : Bang Pahan District
A temple amid a shady and serene natural surrounding, it provides home for a flock of flying foxes and various species of waterfowls such as cormorant, grebe, egret, etc. There is an irrigation canal behind the temple where shoals of various freshwater fish came to take sanctuary. To get there, take Highway No.32, the Asia Highway, to Bang Pahan Intersection, turn right into Highway No.347 and the entrance to the temple is on the right. Continue for another 2 kilometres to the temple, a total distance of approximately 20 kilometres.
Wat Thammikarat
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Thammikarat
Wat Thammikarat
temple in the Mahanikaya Sect, Wat Thammikarat was formerly known as Wat Mukkharat. When King Sainamphueng had Wat Phananchoeng constructed before the establishment of the Kingdom of Ayutthaya, King Thammikarat - his son, had this temple constructed in an old town called Sangkhaburi. The temple had successively been restored by later kings. In the reign of King Songtham (1610 A.D.), the temple was renovated and a Wihan Luang constructed for sermon hearing. The Wihan Luang once enshrined an enormous bronze head of the Buddha of the U Thong period, now exhibited at the Chao Sam Phraya National Museum. The temple also houses a Reclining Buddha hall called Wihan Phra Phutthasaiyat built by his queen consort following her wish made for her daughter's recovery from an ailment. The Wihan is located to the north of Phra Chedi with a base of 52 surrounding Singha or lions, and houses a north-facing reclining Buddha image measuring 12 metres in length, with both feet gilded and inlaid with glass mosaic.
Wat Tum
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Located in Tambon Wat Tum on the bank of Khlong Wat Tum on the Ayutthaya - Ang Thong Road, 6 - 7 kilometres from Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, the temple covers an area of approximately 15 rai. There is no evidence as to when it was constructed and by whom. It is believed to have existed since the Ayothaya period before the establishment of the Kingdom of Ayutthaya and must have once been abandoned after the fall of the Kingdom in 1767, before being renovated in the reign of King Rama I and has resumed a status as a monastic temple ever since. Wat Tum has also served as a temple for a war strategy ceremony for at least 1,000 years presumably since the foundation of Ayutthaya.

The temple houses a special Buddha image of which the top part above the forehead can be lifted and the head finial known as Ketumala can be removed. There is a hollow inside the head deep down nearly to the throat containing drops of seeping drinkable clean water that never runs dry. It is a bronze crowned and bejeweled image of the Buddha seated in the gesture of subduing Mara, measuring 87 centimeters in width and 150 centimeters in height. Originally named "Luangpho Thongsuksamrit", the image is currently called “Luangpho Suk” and is of an unknown origin. The head of the image will be opened on the first day of each month.
Wat Yai Chai Mongkon (Wat Chao Phraya Thai)
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wat Yai Chaimongkhon
Wat Yai Chai Mongkon or
Wat Chao Phraya Thai
Located to the Southeast of the island, this temples lofty chedi is visible from most of the town. The monastery was built in 1900 by King U-thong who granted the temple with the name Wat Pa Kaew. The intention was to create a center of Buddhist studies (Ceylonese Sect). As the temple used to be headed by a patriarch, local people also called it Wat Chao Phraya Thai.

The present name was given granted to the temple by King Naresuan to commemorate a battle fought against the Crown Prince of Burma in 1592. His momentous victory a single-handed combat on the elephant back brought independence to Ayutthaya after 15 years as a Burmese dependent. Within the complex is a huge image of a reclining Buddha in brick and stucco. The chedi is bell-shaped, about 60 meters high, constructed on a mound of raised ground (15 x 32.4 x 32.4 m) with steps going up to the Buddhist image placed midway to the top. The chedi itself now has a distinct tilt, but still can be entered via the stairs.

The Ubosot or ordination hall is windowless but ventilated by pierced holes stretching down the roof on both walls. Also situated in the compound is King Naresuans statue, which is highly revered by Thais.
Opening Hours : Daily from 08:00 am. - 06:00 pm.
Wihan Phramongkhon Bophit
Location : Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District
Wihan Phramongkhon Bophit
Wihan Phramongkhon Bophit
This chapel is located to the south of Wat Phra Si Sanphet. A large bronze seated Buddha image (Phra Mongkhon Bophit) was originally enshrined outside the Grand Palace to the east. It could be dated to the 15th century and was originally intended to stand in the open air. Later, King Songtham commanded it to be transferred to the west, where it is currently enshrined and covered with a Mondop. In the reign of Phra Chao Sua, the top of the Mondop was burnt down by a fire due to a thunderbolt. The King then commanded that a new building be built in th e form of a big sanctuary (Maha Wihan) to cover the image in lieu of the former Mondop. During the second fall of Ayutthaya, the building and the image were badly destroyed by fire. The present Viharn and Buddha image have been reconstructed and renovated. The open area located east of the Viharn was formerly Sanam Luang, where royal cremation ceremonies took place.